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Introduction to ‘Stories from an Alaskan Cabin’

Preface

As Boccaccio’s “Decameron,” Malory’s “Le Morte d’Arthur,” and Chaucer’s “Canterbury Tales” can attest, our forebears were, much as they were in everything, better at telling stories. For what else was there to do in times before the Internet, television, movies, and radio? While modern man finds the need and the capacity to tell stories, the ability and opportunity is much diminished.

However, it has not disappeared. For, we tell ourselves stories every day to support our world views and our self-perception whether those are based on fact or folly doesn’t matter. What parent has not told his or her child a story about how babies are born or a fairytale remembered rather than read? Which schoolchild has not told a story of what he or she wished to be true? What person has not told stories about what he or she would’ve liked to have done to some transgressor against his or her person?

Indeed, humans are not separated from animals by the ability to reason, which any raven, rat, or baboon can show, nor are they separated from animals by the opposable thumb. Humans separate themselves from the rest of the animal kingdom by their flights of fancy, their ability to create, their ability to build, to imagine, and to tell stories.

So, dear friends, as you read these stories, do not think you have any less ability to compose and relay such as these. Instead, know that you have the capability to tell as good a story or better, with a little practice, and you can take it a small step further and write that story down. Talent is not required as long as you are willing to work hard and long and diligently over the course of time to perfect the craft and art of storytelling.

As long as you have read this far and choose to continue to read, my three friends and I hope these stories told at a cabin in the Alaska wilderness in the dead of winter will entertain you for no few hours. And if they can inspire you to create your own story, in words, actions, or other media – all the better. We would love to read them and include them in our storytelling anthology.

Our stories will be released one at a time on Fridays through the power of the Internet. They will be available to Penguinators only, those who join our Patreon at any level. For even when the intentions are good, the power of a story is only as good as its ability to attract an audience. We think these stories are ones that you won’t want to miss. For the next part of the story go to the Prologue. “Tales at an Alaskan Cabin” is now available for preorder at Amazon.

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