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‘Love Is Like This’ Grants New Perspectives on Love

Self-isolation spreads the love

Within the first three pages of “Love Is Like This” by Nathan Deeter, you know you’re holding a work of paramount importance in your hand. This will show you the ways of love in the past, future, and present. It contains the love of sons and fathers, family, husband and wife, and it does so in the way that those kinds of love present themselves. It isn’t the “happily ever after,” but it also isn’t the doom and gloom. It presents the light and the dark of love, and if you let it, it will speak to your soul.

Deeter knows how to craft phrases that strike images and build thoughts. His words create emotion as he explores death as a part of love and life, or maybe life as an interruption of death. His father teaches about death, gore, and how hard life is; his grandma teaches compassion and how the natural world works.

Deeter’s poems present the truth — both universal and of his life – sometimes, with a glance, and sometimes, in your face. It is the personal representation of something greater than an individual because “Love Is Like This.” Most importantly, Deeter’s poems are accessible to everyone. They can be read with a literal interpretation, or they can inspire you to deeper reverie. This collection of poetry will surprise those who find poems a little too academic; they contain a vocabulary for the common man woven into stories designed to improve depth of thought.

I waited several months to finally get my hands on a copy of Deeter’s book. I’m glad I didn’t have to wait any longer. “Love Is Like This” was worth the wait.(This article contains affiliate links. By purchasing the item through the link, you are helping support our writing at no additional cost to you.)

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