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Just One Day Left for More Creativity

Clearly, you can join our Patreon at any time. If at some point you decide our penguins are worth it or you enjoy what I’m writing, you can simply head on over to the Patreon page and put up however much you think it’s worth to you to get creativity articles, penguins photos and more while supporting our ability to create. Whether it’s $1 or $500 or more, your pledge amount, when you decide to give it, doesn’t matter as much as the fact that you’re voting for more positivity, more love and more kindness.  That’s what we’re trying to put out into the world.

However, the offer on the table right now does expire on July 31, 2019. For every 5 people that join before the end of July, I will write an additional creativity article. We have one scheduled for August 14th about the Popeye movie, criticism and creativity. Our penguin photo of the month has been chosen and will be released on August 22. Our Patreon Anniversary is on Aug 12! So, it’ll be a big month for us, and you can make it bigger.

Our penguins are watching the clock. Come join the fun as we explore the finest thing in life: creating. We look forward to moving forward together.

P.S. Did you spot the Easter eggs in the countdown photos?

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2 Days Left to Get More Creativity

If you want better problem-solving skills, interesting articles to read, and photos of stuffed penguins, join us at our Patreon. For every five people that join before July 31, 2019, I’ll write an additional creativity article exclusive for our Patreon members.

From finger painting and playing music to building something in your shop and crocheting, creating something helps you relax and feel better about your life. It’s the active participation in creation that unleashes your ability to tap into the flow and get in the zone. While Maslow places creativity at the top of his hierarchy for self-actualization, creativity can be found at every level human existence. Even people in the direst situations have a desire to create. When your daily life gets to be too much for you, taking some time to get into an area that allows you to engage your whole brain will improve your mood, especially if you eliminate the expectations and just go for it.

If you want to be more creative, you can order books on creativity principles (Disneyland Is Creativity, The Haunted Mansion Is Creativity, and Penguinate! Essays and Short Stories). You can sign up for our email list, and you can join our Patreon. We’re dedicated to helping people achieve greater creativity in life. It starts with us and flows out to you.

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What Would You Do if You Were More Creative?

Three days left for anyone who wants to know how many creativity articles I can write in August. For every 5 people that join our Patreon by July 31, I will write an additional, exclusive creativity article. Bring your friends, take a group photo and sign up for our Patreon. You’ll also get a Penguin photo and some cool stuff depending on the level you join at.

Creativity is the only way that we can advance in our life, as a culture and as a species. Creating is at the core of who we are. Being more creative will free you up to be more of who you are. At our Patreon, we discuss creativity principles and bring them together for good. We look forward to having you join us to become more creative.

We already have “’Popeye’ criticism and Creativity” lined up for release on August 14. The Penguin photo should be released on August 22. And don’t tell anyone, but August 18 is our Patreon anniversary! While three is the magic number for how many days are left. Five is the magic number for extra creativity articles. What would you do if you were more creative? Let’s find out together!

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8 Cool Things about Penguins from 2 Videos

I’ve been doing some research for my next book “Penny Penguin Wants to Fly.” The first video is cool because of the Adelie; the second video is cool because of the chick’s down. In no particular order, my favorite things from these videos are after the first.

  • Emperor penguins abandon their chicks to get the chicks to journey to sea.
  • When they leave, chicks can be about a meter tall!
  • Emperor penguin chicks lose their down after their first swim.
  • The giant petrel can eat penguin chicks. Emperor penguin chicks form a defensive circle.
  • The Adelie is the feistiest penguin in the world.
  • Black wing tips mean the emperor penguin chicks are ready for their first hunt.
  • Emperor penguin chicks will swim for three or four years in the deep ocean before returning to their hatching grounds.

If you want more penguins, order “There Are No Penguins in Alaska” or purchase one of our handmade stuffed penguins. Join our Patreon for penguins, creativity and books.

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Five for Five! Join Our Patreon today and get more Creative!

There are just five days left to get in on our five people equals one additional creativity article for Patreon Penguinators only. In other words, for every five people that join our Patreon by July 31, 2019, I will write an additional article on creativity.

In the past, we’ve had secrets of creativity revealed, steps to greater creativity illuminated, and analysis of movies and TV shows and how they relate to creativity. Many of these articles are supplemented by free content on Penguinate.com. In August, we’ve already scheduled our first article about the 1980 film “Popeye,” criticism and creativity.

Creativity isn’t the only thing you get when you join our Patreon. As a member of our team, you’ll also get a Penguin photo of the month. Last month featured Penny Penguin on a fire engine at Toon Town. She didn’t even have to fight anyone to get on! If you want more creativity in your life, join our team and we’ll build our creative lives together. Thanks!

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Will Our Patreon Be Poppin’? Eight Days Left on Our Special Offer

Our penguins welcome a new penguin

Winds in the east\ Mist comin’ in\ Like something’s a brewin’\ About to begin\ Can’t put me finger\ On what lies in store\ I’ll write an extra article\ If I get five more (patreon members)…

One-man band, poet, chalk artist, chimney sweep… Bert has a lot of jobs in “Mary Poppins” and he does them with style. Anyone who can go up on the rooftops and step in time or chase a cartoon fox through his own drawing has a flexibility of thinking that allows him to be more creative. Flexibility in thinking is one of the four key categories that are measured when scientists study creativity.

We have eight days left in our Patreon promotion. For every five people that join at any level before August 1, I will write an additional creativity article. I already have one ready to go for August 14: “’Popeye,’ criticism, and creativity.” If I did the next one on “Mary Poppins,” my Patreon will be popping!

Join our Patreon today and let’s see how many articles on creativity I can write in a month! (I could probably do a whole series on “Mary Poppins.” The Sherman Brothers, the animation/live action, Julie Andrews and Dick Van Dyke… That’s even without considering the sequel.)

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The Joy of a Carefree Saturday Morning

It wasn’t too long ago when I would get up early on a Saturday, sneak down the stairs with my favorite stuffed animal, Chrissi the Lion, and turn on the TV. I’d keep the volume on low so as not to wake my mom, who worked the night before. It didn’t matter what was on the TV because I would run back upstairs and grab a couple more stuffed animals to sit with. Then I would go to the kitchen and get some cereal. Most of the time, it would be something sugary like Mr. T Cereal, Cap’n Crunchberries, or Lucky Charms. One time it was Corn Bran; my grandpa had brought a case of the cereal with him during a visit, and they were surprisingly good in spite of the name and the fact that there was no surprise inside.

When I was finally set up and ready to eat, I’d switch the channel until I found a favorite show. “Disney’s Adventures of the Gummi Bears” were bouncing here and there and everywhere with their gummi berry juice. You can’t stop “The Littles” because the Littles don’t stop. “Hong Kong Phooey” was quicker than the human eye.

If my sister was up, we’d watch “Monchichi” because they were oh so soft and cuddly. “The Smurfs” facing off against Gargamel and Azrael were a favorite. “Punky Brewster” reminded us of my sister and served as a role model of sorts.

Of course, the commercials, with Time for Timer and his snack tips, Schoolhouse Rocks with their musical educational lessons from “Conjunction Junction” to “I’m Just a Bill,” and Tony the Tiger extolling the questionable virtue of a cereal that ended soggy in the bowl, were great!  I’d finish out the day’s TV watching activity with “Dungeons and Dragons” and “The Land of the Lost.” My cat Clyde sat on my lap purring.

We’d adjourn to the upstairs where I could make a little more noise. I’d grab my Legos to build spaceships or a model of some building (I never had enough Legos to complete the building), or I’d set up my Lincoln Logs with my action figures and army men and use my Burning Key Cars, cars with the key for speed, to knock down the fortifications.

If you’ve ever been a fan of Saturday morning cartoons, now is the perfect time for you to capture the feeling and essence of your inner child. For far too long, you’ve been hiding the best part of you behind a cloak of responsibility and adulthood. Now it’s time to unleash your creative self. Once you’ve rediscovered what it feels like to be young again, you can harness your curiosity and creativity.

So, get out your stuffed animals, set them up on the couch facing the TV, grab a bowl of cereal, and watch a couple of episodes of your favorite Saturday morning cartoons. Need to add some friends to your stuffed animals, check out our handmade penguins!

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Curiosity Leads Down the ‘Penguin Highway’

In “Penguin Highway” by Tomihiko Morimi, Aoyama is a curious boy in the fourth grade. He takes copious notes, researches everything, makes observations, and never gets angry. When ever he feels like he might get angry, he thinks of breasts, and it calms him down. Is that normal for a fourth grader? I don’t know, but it’s normal for Aoyama, who is clearly not an ordinary child.

When Aoyama is confronted with several problems, he decides to research them all. His friend Uchida and the girl Hamamoto help him with the time he has to spend on researching “The Sea.” Uchida is also part of his exploring and mapping the town. His side project is researching the lady from the dentist office who can make penguins, which is what sparks the whole story.

Aoyama shows that its not good enough to ask the questions. He keeps a journal with him at all times. Hamamoto does the same, and Uchida learns to use a notebook, even if he isn’t the smartest one in the group. Taking notes allows Aoyama to access the information he has learned at a later time. It also allows him to manipulate the data, so he can get a bigger picture.

Taking notes requires observation skills. Aoyama has practiced observing, so he sees what others may miss. He then makes hypotheses and tests them to see if they can withstand the scientific method. He knows his theories are most likely wrong, but it’s important to make and test them.

Aoyama’s methods are honed and only missing one piece – sometimes, the answer doesn’t lie in the logic of a situation or possible behavior. In creativity, the process is similar: take notes, observe, ask questions and stay curious; sometimes, you have to make that intuitive leap to a better answer.

If you’re looking for another good read, check out these books on my website.

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The Email List: Struggles and Reasons

I’ve been struggling with this idea of an email list for several reasons. It’s a lot of extra work. It’s an extra expense. I don’t really like the email lists I’ve joined, and I was hoping that people would migrate over to my Patreon where we can make beautiful words and penguins together. (You can still migrate to Patreon and get cool things for as little as a dollar a month.)

Extra Work

I already write at least one post a day for my blog; I surpassed 200 days of posting in a row on July 12, 2019. I plan on keeping that streak alive, but it isn’t easy to come up with something new every day. I try to write 3 posts a day for my SEO job when they have work available. I need to write posts for my Patreon – one or two a month. I edit books as a side job.

Adding one more thing to my list of things to do, which includes marketing, continued learning, reading, refilling the creative well, dishes, laundry and other housework, taxes, teaching English, searching for freelance jobs to supplement my income, keeping my social media accounts active and relevant, and spending time with my wife and family, is a little overwhelming, especially when I really have no idea what I’m doing. How can I keep an email list current and active while still finding time to write my next book?

Extra Expense

MailChimp offers free limited use email lists. If I get more than 2,000 subscribers or I want to do something cool like set up a series of future emails, I’m going to have to pay up for that. This extra expense may end up being worth it, but right now, it’s hard to justify. Automation would be great for an introduction to Penguinate.com and its creativity, books and penguins. For now, I have to live with what there is – the opportunity to follow up with an immediate discount email, a day later intro email, and an email on the first of the month that rounds up everything I posted on my blog. Then, I’ll hope people don’t forget who I was when the next email I send is more than a month away.

Other Email Lists

Russell Nohelty and some other people do these great list building contests. For a small fee, authors join the list builder. The money is pooled to come up with a prize package that people will really want based on a fandom, like Doctor Who, Firefly, or Marvel. I’ve signed up for a couple of these and ended up on email lists that were not what I was expecting. (Who knew Buffy the Vampire Slayer was related to the reverse harem genre of books?) Aside from that, I received 20 to 40 different emails or more during a two-day period after the sign up and those emails keep coming until I unsubscribe. They aren’t just from the authors, they’re from Amazon, Kickstarter, GoodReads, and other websites the authors had people sign up at to get more entries. (I did not win the Buffy swag, by the way.)

All the emails end up being the same. Hi, I’m author, here’s what I’ve been working on, here’s a free (short story, book), here’s a contest you haven’t entered, here are some other free books… I don’t want to inundate your email inbox with emails you aren’t going to read, and I haven’t figured out how to make an email that is any different. Why would I want to make an email list where people will get the same thing (minus the freebies) that other authors are already sending out? Do you really want pictures of my cat? (If so, I’ll send them, but she doesn’t like being photographed.)

On Patreon

I was really hoping to build my Patreon into a juggernaut. If I could get 600 people signed up at a dollar each, my financial situation would be much more stable. It wouldn’t give me the opportunity to quite everything, but it would reduce the amount of freelance and SEO work I had to do. Unfortunately, I still haven’t got a handle on how best to get fans to sign up for the Patreon. I’ve offered discounts at any level. I’ve created offers, like join at $30 for three months and get a penguin. I’ve posted about it on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest. I haven’t figured out how to grow any of my social networks beyond a certain number and Patreon is the same right now.

Why Am I Doing It?

I am starting an email list because it’s the best way to keep you in the loop about what Jenya and I are doing creatively. YouTube changed its criteria for creators to monetize videos. Facebook changed its algorithm, so that creators had to pay to get their fans to see what’s being posted on the fan page; it has also randomly marked my penguin8.com as spam without giving me a reason or checking the posts that I sent notices about. Weebly eliminated access to its website for anyone geographically listed in Russia and other countries. These changes have made it more difficult for creators to make a living off of random and organic growth. They have also shown that these companies control my eCommerce to a degree that is not only uncomfortable and unprofitable but also dangerously close to being able to remove my presence from my largest outlets with a small change in their algorithms. I can’t count on social media and search engines to drive organic views to my websites.

In addition to this, my SEO job ebbs and flows. There have been days when there just aren’t any articles to write. I need to find a better way to make money, and every other book and website I’ve read about being a creator in the Internet age says an email is the only way to go. When a website like examiner.com or MySpace shuts down or becomes less visited, the email list is still there to sustain the creator. In theory, I’m in control of the email list, and thus in control of my destiny. And isn’t that all anyone really wants? To control his or her direction?

So, please sign up for our email list. Like share, comment on our social media posts and sign up for our Patreon. I look forward to you becoming honorary Penguinators.

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